About Us

Myth and Realities

Myth: Hospice is a place.
Reality: Hospice care usually takes place in the comfort of an individual's home, but can be provided in any environment in which a person lives, including a nursing home, assisted living facility, or residential care facility.

Myth: Hospice means that the patient will soon die.
Reality: Receiving hospice care does not mean giving up hope or that death is imminent. The earlier an individual receives hospice care, the more opportunity there is to stabilize a patient's medical condition and address other needs.

Myth: Hospice provides 24-hour care.
Reality: The hospice team visits patients intermittently, and is available 24 hours a day/7 days a week for support and care. We are able to provide "continuous care," but patients must meet specific criteria, requiring nursing care at the patient's bedside for this to be put into action.

Myth: All hospice programs are the same.
Reality: All licensed hospice programs must provide certain services, but the range of support services and programs may differ. In addition, hospice programs and operating styles may vary froms tate to state depending on state laws and regulations.

Myth: Hospice is just for the patient.
Reality: Hospice focuses on comfort, dignity, and emotional support. The quality of life for the patient, and also family members and others, who are caregivers, is the highest priority.

Myth: After six months, patients are no longer eligible to receive hospice care through Medicare and other insurances.
Reality: According to the Medicare hospice program, services may be provided to terminally ill Medicare beneficiaries with a life expectancy of six months or less. However, if the patient lives beyond the initial six months, he or she can continue receiving hospice care as long as the attending physician recertifies that the patient is terminally ill. Hospice will continue to services as long as the patient meets hospice criteria of having a ternimal prognosis.

Myth: Once a patient elects hospice care, he or she cannot return to traditional medical treatment.
Reality: Patients always have the right to reinstate traditional care at anytime, for any reason. If a patient's condition improve or the disease goes into remission, he or she can be discharged from a hospice and return to aggressive, curative measures, if so desired. At anytime a patient can return to hospice care as long as the criteria for service is met.

Myth: Hospice means giving up hope.
Reality: When faced with a terminal illness, many patients and family members tend to dwell on the imminent loss of life rather than on making the most of the life that remains. Hospice helps patients reclaim the spirits of life. It helps them understand that even though death can lead to sadness, anger, and pain, it can also lead to opportunities for reminiscence, laughter, reunion, and hope. Recent studies show that some patients improve and no longer require services of hospice.